VFW Magazine — June/July 2017
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VFW HEADS TO THE CRESCENT CITY
JANIE DYHOUSE

For the eighth time in the organization’s history, New Orleans will host VFW’s national convention.

Those of you attending VFW’s 118th National Convention in New Orleans, La., July 22-26, know the importance of the work at hand. But do you know why this year’s convention city is referred to as “The Big Easy”?

According to New Orleans lore, Betty Guillaud, a Times-Picayune columnist referred to the city as “The Big Easy” in the 1970s when comparing it to the fast-paced living of New York City.

New Orleans is home to many sites of historic importance. Make sure you take some time to stroll the streets of the French Quarter or visit the National WWII Museum.

In New Orleans, there are 20 historic districts on the National Register, more than any other city in the United States.

Below is a sampling of things to do when you have a break from VFW business.

CHALMETTE BATTLEFIELD AND NATIONAL CEMETERY (LEFT)
8606 WEST ST. BERNARD HIGHWAY
(504) 281-0510

(504) 281-0510
Located about seven miles downriver from the French Quarter, this is the site of the Jan. 8, 1815, Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812. It was the last large battle of that war between the U.S. and Britain. There are daily park rang-er talks at 10:45 a.m. and 2:45 p.m. when the Creole Queen Excursion boat docks at the battlefield.

The cemetery is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Americans representing conflicts from the War of 1812 to the Vietnam War are buried in Chalmette. There are about 16,000 dead buried in the cemetery.

JACKSON BARRACKS MILITARY MUSEUM JACKSON BARRACKS, AREA C
4209 CHENAULT BLVD. • (504) 278-8664

This museum tells the story of Louisiana’s National Guard from the colonial period through present day. On display are historic battalion flags, parade uniforms, diaries and a collection of war letters.

It is open Monday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

JACKSON SQUARE
700 DECATUR ST. • (504) 658-3200

A park in the historic French Quarter, Jackson Square was originally known as Place d’Arme, a military parade ground. Today, it serves as a meeting place for musicians, artists, historians and tourists. The area was renamed Jackson Square in 1851 to honor Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), hero of the notorious Battle of New Orleans and seventh president.

NATIONAL WWII MUSEUM
945 MAGAZINE ST. • (504) 528-1944

Opened in June 2000, the National WWII Museum boasts 19 galleries, 190,000 artifacts and 8,800 personal accounts. Visitors can walk through a recreation of the Ardennes Forest of Belgium and Luxembourg and experience what it was like during America’s first battles with the German and Italian armies in North Africa.

The museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART 1 COLLINS DIBOLL CIRCLE • (504) 658-4100

Founded in 1911, the museum houses a $200 million collection in 46 galleries. Special collections include the Peter Carl Faberge treasures and the Latin American Colonial collection. By appointment only, researchers can view some of the library’s non-circulation 30,000 volumes.

The museum is open Tuesday through Thursday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., until 9 p.m. on Fridays and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART
925 CAMP ST. • (504) 539-9600

First opened in 2003 in the historic Warehouse Arts District, the museum is home to the largest and most comprehensive collection of southern art in the world, showcasing art from 15 southern states and the District of Columbia.

It is open Wednesday through Monday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Thursdays 6-8 p.m.

PRESERVATION HALL
726 ST PETER ST. • (504) 522-2841

Established in 1961, Preservation Hall celebrates the history of music in America. It strives to “protect and honor New Orleans Jazz.” Acoustic jazz performances are held nightly in this intimate venue.

Monday-Wednesday show times are 8 p.m., 9 p.m. and 10 p.m. and Thursday-Sunday 6 p.m., 8 p.m., 9 p.m. and 10 p.m.

ST. LOUIS CATHEDRAL
615 PERE ANTOINE ALLEY
(504) 525-9585

St. Louis Cathedral is the oldest continuously operating Catholic cathedral in the United States. Since 1727, New Orleanians have worshipped here. The current cathedral, with its white, three-steeple façade, is actually the third church on this site. Hurricanes and fires destroyed the first two. Free tours are offered several times per day. A small garden behind the cathedral has a memorial to the victims of yellow fever, which plagued the mosquito-infested city in the 18th and 19th centuries.

The cathedral is open daily from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. with daily Mass at 12:05 p.m.
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