Froedtert Today May 2013 : Page 14

LQQR YDWLRQ Q HeartWare ® HVAD Improved Technology Before Heart Transplant atients treated for advanced heart failure at Froedtert & The Medical College of Wisconsin are among the first in the United States, outside of clinical trials, to receive the latest-generation ventricular assist devices, or VADs, to improve their quality of life until a donor heart is available for transplant. Heart failure, which affects more than 5 million Americans, occurs when the heart cannot provide enough pump action to distribute blood throughout the body, causing a range of serious health issues. While most people respond to medication or lifestyle changes, about 5 percent require advanced treatment, and a smaller number could benefit from a heart transplant. But with only about 2,200 hearts available nationally for transplant annually, a VAD can keep a patient’s blood pumping until a donor heart becomes available. “VADs are life-saving devices,” said Claudius Mahr, DO, Medical College of Wisconsin advanced heart failure and transplant cardiologist, and medical director of the Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation Program. “The first generation of VADs could last only about 18 months, were larger and contained more moving parts. This latest evolution, called the HeartWare ® HVAD, refines the devices further.” Implanted directly on top of the heart, it is suspended by magnets and lubricated with the patient’s own blood. It has only one moving part, likely making it less prone to mechanical wear so it could last significantly longer than the previous device. It is not known how long it can last in a patient, as that data doesn’t exist yet. “It can supply as much blood flow as a normal human heart,” Dr. Mahr said, “so the patient’s quality of life is noticeably better and a lot of related health issues are improved or resolved. Eighty percent of patients have no or very mild heart failure symptoms six weeks after receiving the device.” Q &/$8',86 Froedtert & The Medical College of Wisconsin heart and vascular services are available in Menomonee Falls, Waukesha, Wauwatosa and West Bend. Call 1-800-DOCTORS to speak to a Froedtert & The Medical College of Wisconsin representative who can help you find a doctor that’s right for your condition. To learn more about the Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation Program, visit froedtert.com/heart. Q 0$+5&#0f;'2 3 Nightly Seizures Put to Rest always said her seizures were like a stalker because we never knew when they were going to show up – our family was always on guard,” said Karen Sanders of her daughter, Tate’s, lifelong battle with epilepsy. Tate, now 22, began experiencing seizures shortly after she was born. Over the years, Karen made every effort to help her daughter. “We’d seen every doctor, tried every medication,” Karen said. “Nothing worked.” So when the time came to consider surgery, Karen turned to the Comprehensive Epilepsy Program at Froedtert & The Medical College of Wisconsin. It is designated a Level 4 program, the highest rating from the National Association of Epilepsy Centers, and is one of only four hospitals in the country certified as a Center of Excellence for Epilepsy by The Joint Commission. “We knew surgery was an option, but we didn’t want to go that route until we had exhausted every other avenue,” Karen said. “Brain surgery is not a trivial matter,” said Manoj Raghavan, MD, PhD, Medical College of Wisconsin neurologist and director of the program. “And not everyone for whom medications fail can get surgical treatment. We thoroughly evaluate every potential candidate to determine where in the brain the seizures originate and if it is possible to have surgery in that region without compromising significant function such as speech, movement or vision.” In Tate’s case, evaluation included implanting electrodes under the skull near the temporal lobes to “capture” a few seizures, a diagnostic strategy which confirmed where her seizures Q 7RS&#1d; .$5(1 DQG 7$7(6$1'(56&#1e; originated. Armed with this information, Wade Mueller, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin %RWWRP&#1d; 0$12-5$*+$9$1&#0f;0'&#0f;3K' neurosurgeon, removed tissue where the seizures originated. Now Tate is seizure-free. “She’s really happy for the first time in her life,” Karen said. “And everyone is just floored by the change. It has been a physical, emotional and mental miracle. Now, we are so hopeful for the future.” To learn more about the Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, including its growing number of epilepsy specialists, visit froedtert.com/epilepsy. It is one of the few programs in the country providing comprehensive, individualized care, addressing not only patients’ seizures, but also its impact on their lives such as social and workplace challenges. Q 14 Froedtert Today 0D\
 froedtert.com ´,

Innovation

Improved Technology Before Heart Transplant<br /> <br /> Patients treated for advanced heart failure at Froedtert & The Medical College of Wisconsin are among the first in the United States, outside of clinical trials, to receive the latest-generation ventricular assist devices, or VADs, to improve their quality of life until a donor heart is available for transplant.<br /> <br /> Heart failure, which affects more than 5 million Americans, occurs when the heart cannot provide enough pump action to distribute blood throughout the body, causing a range of serious health issues. While most people respond to medication or lifestyle changes, about 5 percent require advanced treatment, and a smaller number could benefit from a heart transplant. But with only about 2,200 hearts available nationally for transplant annually, a VAD can keep a patient’s blood pumping until a donor heart becomes available.<br /> <br /> “VADs are life-saving devices,” said Claudius Mahr, DO, Medical College of Wisconsin advanced heart failure and transplant cardiologist, and medical director of the Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation Program. “The first generation of VADs could last only about 18 months, were larger and contained more moving parts. This latest evolution, called the HeartWare® HVAD, refines the devices further.” Implanted directly on top of the heart, it is suspended by magnets and lubricated with the patient’s own blood. It has only one moving part, likely making it less prone to mechanical wear so it could last significantly longer than the previous device. It is not known how long it can last in a patient, as that data doesn’t exist yet.<br /> <br /> “It can supply as much blood flow as a normal human heart,” Dr. Mahr said, “so the patient’s quality of life is noticeably better and a lot of related health issues are improved or resolved. Eighty percent of patients have no or very mild heart failure symptoms six weeks after receiving the device.” <br /> <br /> Froedtert & The Medical College of Wisconsin heart and vascular services are available in Menomonee Falls, Waukesha, Wauwatosa and West Bend. Call 1-800-DOCTORS to speak to a Froedtert & The Medical College of Wisconsin representative who can help you find a doctor that’s right for your condition. To learn more about the Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation Program, visit froedtert.com/heart.<br /> <br /> Nightly Seizures Put to Rest <br /> <br /> "I Always said her seizures were like a stalker because we never knew when they were going to show up – our family was always on guard,” said Karen Sanders of her daughter, Tate’s, lifelong battle with epilepsy. Tate, now 22, began experiencing seizures shortly after she was born. Over the years, Karen made every effort to help her daughter.<br /> <br /> “We’d seen every doctor, tried every medication,” Karen said. “Nothing worked.” So when the time came to consider surgery, Karen turned to the Comprehensive Epilepsy Program at Froedtert & The Medical College of Wisconsin. It is designated a Level 4 program, the highest rating from the National Association of Epilepsy Centers, and is one of only four hospitals in the country certified as a Center of Excellence for Epilepsy by The Joint Commission.<br /> <br /> “We knew surgery was an option, but we didn’t want to go that route until we had exhausted every other avenue,” Karen said.<br /> <br /> “Brain surgery is not a trivial matter,” said Manoj Raghavan, MD, PhD, Medical College of Wisconsin neurologist and director of the program. “And not everyone for whom medications fail can get surgical treatment. We thoroughly evaluate every potential candidate to determine where in the brain the seizures originate and if it is possible to have surgery in that region without compromising significant function such as speech, movement or vision.” <br /> <br /> In Tate’s case, evaluation included implanting electrodes under the skull near the temporal lobes to “capture” a few seizures, a diagnostic strategy which confirmed where her seizures originated. Armed with this information, Wade Mueller, MD, Medical College of Wisconsin neurosurgeon, removed tissue where the seizures originated.<br /> <br /> Now Tate is seizure-free. “She’s really happy for the first time in her life,” Karen said. “And everyone is just floored by the change. It has been a physical, emotional and mental miracle. Now, we are so hopeful for the future.” <br /> <br /> To learn more about the Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, including its growing number of epilepsy specialists, visit froedtert.com/epilepsy. It is one of the few programs in the country providing comprehensive, individualized care, addressing not only patients’ seizures, but also its impact on their lives such as social and workplace challenges.

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here