The Packer March 20, 2017 : A-1

Abundant supplies drive prices down BRUSSELS SPROUTS MARKETING, A20 SINCE 1893, THE BUSINESS NEWS SOURCE OF THE PRODUCE INDUSTRY CXXIV, No. 12 MARCH 20, 2017 Family of Brands ProduceRetailer.com ProduceMarketGuide.com thepacker.com/fresh-trends MidwestProducexpo.com West CoastProducexpo.com Southern Exposure shows it takes more than magic By Greg Johnson Editor More from Southern Exposure ORLANDO, Fla. — Southern Expo-sure 2017’s theme was “The Magic of Produce,” but the recipe for another suc-cessful event was hardly hocus pocus. Take the perfect late winter weather in central Florida, 288 exhibitors, 480 retail and food-service buyers among the 2,600 registered attend-ees, and it’s easy to See a video see why attendees on this story at were happy they thepacker.com/video made the trip. “Being at a Disney property, we tried to make it extra sensory,” said David Sherrod, executive director of the Millen, Ga.-based Southeast Produce Council. “I haven’t had any complaints,” he said March 11 toward the end of the expo. Teri Miller, SEPC president and produce se-nior category manager for The Fresh Market, Greensboro, N.C., said the March 9-11 event at the Walt Dis-ney World Dolphin Resort went smooth-ly, especially for their first time there. “It’s been great for learning about products and retailers,” she said. “The entertainment (at Southern Expo-sure) lets people get to know each other and not just make it a transactional event.” Exhibitors were generally pleased with the event that they’ve come to ex-pect good things from. Roger Pepperl, marketing direc-tor for Stemilt Growers, Wenatchee, Wash., said the event met expectations with steady buyer traffic for the first NEW PRODUCTS A4, A6 Publix’s Bergstrom honored A5 Pamela Riemenschneider IT’S MAGIC! Scenes from the show A7 Mark Carroll (left), vice president of merchandising for produce and floral for The Fresh Market, and Kent Kuwata, category manager for Smart & Final, had a brief California reunion at the keynote lunch at Southern Exposure. Carroll recently left Cali-fornia-based Gelson’s for North Carolina-based The Fresh Market. two-thirds of the expo. Dana Mulroy, sales manager for Fresh-line Produce, Mahwah, N.J., said her booth was packed with retailers asking about the company’s new line of vegetable noodles. Southern Exposure is about more than just the expo. The March 9 Tom Page Golf Classic hosted about 320 golf-ers over two courses and raised more than $10,000 for council charities. The March 10 education workshops were highlighted by four southern state agriculture commissioners, who all sang ag’s praises to their state economies. Gary Black, Georgia’s agriculture commissioner, summed it up by say-ing “Ag in Georgia makes life better.” Sheila Carden, Richmond, Va.-based regional merchandiser manager for the National Watermelon Promotion Board, was honored with the Terry Vorhees Lifetime Achievement Award March 11. “I’ve never been around people who have been so caring and generous,” she said of her SEPC colleagues. Garry Bergstrom, retired director of produce for Lakeland-based Publix Su-per Markets Inc., received the Lifetime Member Award to go with “a lifetime of memories.” (Story, A5) And keynote speaker Willie Rob-ertson of Duck Dynasty fame flattered attendees, saying as his family’s main cook he goes to the supermarket four or five times a week and always starts in the produce department. “I am your customer!” he said. Next year’s event moves back to the Tampa Convention Center in early March. Produce for Kids award winners A9 Potatoes USA wants to use athletes to spread performance message By Tom Karst National Editor WHAT’S INSIDE DENVER — Borrowing a page from Gatorade, Potatoes USA will use elite endurance athletes to promote its perfor-mance message. The group, convening March 14-16 for its annual meeting, has settled on performance as a key health benefit it wants to communicate to consumers in a long-term strategy (see related coverage, A14). Athletes can play a key role in accelerating the popularity and acceptance of products, said Blair Richardson, president and CEO. “Gatorade was not the drink of every child and family mem-ber out there when they start-ed,” he said. “They started with athletes and the athletes changed per-ceptions.” Richardson said Potatoes USA thinks the industry can change public perceptions, us-ing the help of performance athletes. “Why are marathon runners putting in their pouches small potatoes that they have roast-ed ahead of time and eat them along the way as they are run-ning the marathon?” he said. “Because they already know that (potatoes) are a really awe-some product.” The path to use athletes as spokespeople for spuds is un-der development, Potatoes USA leaders said. “We don’t have a full road ‘Why are marathon runners putting in their pouches small potatoes that they have roasted ahead of time and eat them along the way as they are run-ning the marathon? Because they already know that (potatoes) are a really awesome product.’ BLAIR RICHARDSON POTATOES USA Fruit growers see Mexico as important market MORE COVERAGE, A14 map yet, but we know there is an opportunity,” said John Toaspern, chief marketing offi-cer for Potatoes USA. He said U.S. endurance ath-letes, who number about 22 million, consume much more potatoes than average consum-ers, he said. Another 38 million people work out four to five times per week, care about what they eat and emulate performance ath-letes, he said. When you add in people that work out at least once a week, Toaspern said that the number of people who care about their athletic performance numbers 112 million in the U.S. Even white-collar workers need strong cognitive perfor-mance, and Toaspern said good carbs from potatoes allow those people to perform better. Kim Breshears, director of marketing programs for Po-tatoes USA, said the focus on performance is a long-term strategy. The first steps will be to in-vest in research on how pota-toes provide consumers with an important part of a healthy lifestyle. “We have a lot of good ev-idence that is available today, but we need to build on that foundation,” she said. Eventually, she said Potatoes USA may seek out sponsorship of high-profile athletic events and leverage the power of influ-encers to enhance the appeal of potatoes. Expo coverage, A16 Plenty of kale CROPS & MARKETS, A11 Now with Cherry Vision 2 PRODUCE OPS , A17 Business is booming GREENHOUSE MARKETING, A19 Bumper crop from Sunshine State FLORIDA SPRING PRODUCE, B1 Convenience rules FRESH-CUT/ VALUE-ADDED MARKETING, B5

Southern Exposure Shows It Takes More Than Magic

Greg Johnson

ORLANDO, Fla. — Southern Exposure 2017’s theme was “The Magic of Produce,” but the recipe for another successful event was hardly hocus pocus.

Take the perfect late winter weather in central Florida, 288 exhibitors, 480 retail and foodservice buyers among the 2,600 registered attendees, and it’s easy to see why attendees were happy they made the trip.

“Being at a Disney property, we tried to make it extra sensory,” said David Sherrod, executive director of the Millen, Ga.-based Southeast Produce Council.

“I haven’t had any complaints,” he said March 11 toward the end of the expo.

Teri Miller, SEPC president and produce senior category manager for The Fresh Market, Greensboro, N.C., said the March 9-11 event at the Walt Disney World Dolphin Resort went smoothly, especially for their first time there.

“It’s been great for learning about products and retailers,” she said.

“The entertainment (at Southern Exposure) lets people get to know each other and not just make it a transactional event.”

Exhibitors were generally pleased with the event that they’ve come to expect good things from.

Roger Pepperl, marketing director for Stemilt Growers, Wenatchee, Wash., said the event met expectations with steady buyer traffic for the first two-thirds of the expo.

Dana Mulroy, sales manager for Freshline Produce, Mahwah, N.J., said her booth was packed with retailers asking about the company’s new line of vegetable noodles.

Southern Exposure is about more than just the expo. The March 9 Tom Page Golf Classic hosted about 320 golfers over two courses and raised more than $10,000 for council charities.

The March 10 education workshops were highlighted by four southern state agriculture commissioners, who all sang ag’s praises to their state economies.

Gary Black, Georgia’s agriculture commissioner, summed it up by saying “Ag in Georgia makes life better.”

Sheila Carden, Richmond, Va.-based regional merchandiser manager for the National Watermelon Promotion Board, was honored with the Terry Vorhees Lifetime Achievement Award March 11.

“I’ve never been around people who have been so caring and generous,” she said of her SEPC colleagues.

Garry Bergstrom, retired director of produce for Lakeland-based Publix Super Markets Inc., received the Lifetime Member Award to go with “a lifetime of memories.” (Story, A5)

And keynote speaker Willie Robertson of Duck Dynasty fame flattered attendees, saying as his family’s main cook he goes to the supermarket four or five times a week and always starts in the produce department.

“I am your customer!” he said.

Next year’s event moves back to the Tampa Convention Center in early March.

Read the full article at http://digitaledition.qwinc.com/article/Southern+Exposure+Shows+It+Takes+More+Than+Magic/2739800/393317/article.html.

Potatoes USA Wants To Use Athletes To Spread Performance Message

Tom Karst

DENVER — Borrowing a page from Gatorade, Potatoes USA will use elite endurance athletes to promote its performance message.

The group, convening March 14-16 for its annual meeting, has settled on performance as a key health benefit it wants to communicate to consumers in a long-term strategy (see related coverage, A14).

Athletes can play a key role in accelerating the popularity and acceptance of products, said Blair Richardson, president and CEO.

“Gatorade was not the drink of every child and family member out there when they started,” he said.

“They started with athletes and the athletes changed perceptions.”

Richardson said Potatoes USA thinks the industry can change public perceptions, using the help of performance athletes.

“Why are marathon runners putting in their pouches small potatoes that they have roasted ahead of time and eat them along the way as they are running the marathon?” he said.

“Because they already know that (potatoes) are a really awesome product.”

The path to use athletes as spokespeople for spuds is under development, Potatoes USA leaders said.

“We don’t have a full road map yet, but we know there is an opportunity,” said John Toaspern, chief marketing officer for Potatoes USA.

He said U.S. endurance athletes, who number about 22 million, consume much more potatoes than average consumers, he said.

Another 38 million people work out four to five times per week, care about what they eat and emulate performance athletes, he said.

When you add in people that work out at least once a week, Toaspern said that the number of people who care about their athletic performance numbers 112 million in the U.S.

Even white-collar workers need strong cognitive performance, and Toaspern said good carbs from potatoes allow those people to perform better.

Kim Breshears, director of marketing programs for Potatoes USA, said the focus on performance is a long-term strategy.

The first steps will be to invest in research on how potatoes provide consumers with an important part of a healthy lifestyle.

“We have a lot of good evidence that is available today, but we need to build on that foundation,” she said.

Eventually, she said Potatoes USA may seek out sponsorship of high-profile athletic events and leverage the power of influencers to enhance the appeal of potatoes.

'Why are marathon runners putting in their pouches small potatoes that they have roasted ahead of time and eat them along the way as they are running the marathon? Because they already know that (potatoes) are a really awesome product.’

BLAIR RICHARDSON POTATOES USA

Read the full article at http://digitaledition.qwinc.com/article/Potatoes+USA+Wants+To+Use+Athletes+To+Spread+Performance+Message/2739806/393317/article.html.

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