Mid Atlantic Thoroughbred January 2011 : Maryland1

January 2011 Maryland Horse Inside Story by Sean Clancy. Photographs by Barrie B. Reightler. Offi cial publication of the Maryland Horse Breeders Association; Vol. 76, No. 1 Smithwick legacy carries on at historic Andor Farm In memoriam: Catharine Allan, Bryan Koch . 7 Maryland-bred stakes winners ... 5 Maryland Fund Report ................ 3 Maryland Fund stakes recaps Blind Date ................................. 4 Catch a Thief ............................ 4 Maryland Horse Industry Board grants ........... 7 Maryland’s leading sires .............. 8 Maryland’s top earners ................ 8 MHBA membership form ............. 8 MHC Horseman of Year: Bob Eldredge .......................... 6 Retraining race horses .................. 7 Smithwick legacy ........................... 1 Southern States rebate .................. 7 M ARYLAND H ORSE B REEDERS A SSOCIATION I NC . 30 East Padonia Road Timonium, MD 21093 P.O. Box 427 Timonium, MD 21094 410-252-2100 Fax 410-560-0503 www.marylandthoroughbred.com BOARD OF DIRECTORS R. Thomas Bowman President A. Brice Ridgely Vice-president Milton P. Higgins III Secretary-treasurer Cricket Goodall Executive director Donald H. Barr, Amy H. Daney, Rebecca B. Davis, James T. Dresher Jr., Carlos A. Garcia, JoAnn Hayden, Ann Merryman, Suzanne Moscarelli, E. Allen Murray, Michael Pons, William S. Reightler Jr., Frank P. Wright Directors Emeritus J. William Boniface, King T. Leatherbury, Donald P. Litz Jr., Robert T. Manfuso, Katharine M. Voss aura Pickett, Forest Boyce and Alex White met at Hall of Fame trainer Mikey Smithwick’s farm in Hydes, Md. The girls did everything there – mucking stalls, riding foxhunters, rubbing timber horses. They jumped fences from the walk. They learned about legs. They rode don-keys, mules, ponies. They rode in mock races and shows on the farm. The place was part summer camp, part rac-ing stable, where kids learned from the ground up and back down again. The iconic horseman was as much a teacher as he was a horse trainer, instilling life-long horsemanship to any kid who came through the farm. His mantras included: Think like a horse. . . know their legs like you know the back of your hand. . . it’s easier for a green horse to jump downhill than uphill. . . the more things to spook at (peacocks, dogs, goats), the better. Born in Maryland and like horses? You went to Mikey’s. Alumni include all-time lead-ing steeplechase jockey Joe Aitcheson, top Irish jump jockey Paul Carberry, Triple Crown-winning trainer Billy Turner, champion steeple-chase trainer Jack Fisher, Olympic show rider and first woman to ride the Maryland Hunt Cup Kathy Kusner, L 1 Alex White with four-time winner Colony Club and her traveling companion Tiger. Maryland Hunt Cup-winning riders Billy Meister, Tommy Smith and Turney McKnight, Maryland Jockey Club racing secretary Georganne Hale, Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association presi-dent Richard Hoffberger, most of the hunt field at Elkridge-Harford and three women who usually start their day at Andor Farm in Monkton, Md. Formerly Foxhall Farm, home of legendary sportsman Foxhall Keene and the Foxhall Team Race, the farm serves as home for Pickett, stable for White and launching pad for Boyce. Pickett and her husband, Taylor, bought the 130-acre farm from the estate of Mi-chael Wettach about 11 years ago. Nestled in Elkridge-Har-ford hunt country, just down the road from Tom and Mimi Voss’s Atlanta Hall Farm, Andor Farm, once owned by Wettach’s mother, Guggen-heim heiress Barbara Obre, has a long history of horses, including Triple Crown win-

Maryland Newsletter

Smithwick legacy carries on at historic Andor Farm<br /> <br /> Story by Sean Clancy. Photographs by Barrie B. Reightler<br /> <br /> Laura Pickett, Forest Boyce and Alex White met at Hall of Fame trainer Mikey Smithwick’s farm in Hydes, Md. The girls did everything there – mucking stalls, riding foxhunters, rubbing timber horses.They jumped fences from the walk. They learned about legs. They rode donkeys, mules, ponies. They rode in mock races and shows on the farm. The place was part summer camp, part racing stable, where kids learned from the ground up and back down again.<br /> <br /> The iconic horseman was as much a teacher as he was a horse trainer, instilling lifelong horsemanship to any kid who came through the farm.His mantras included: Think like a horse. . . Know their legs like you know the back of your hand. . . It’s easier for a green horse to jump downhill than uphill. . . The more things to spook at (peacocks, dogs, goats), the better.<br /> <br /> Born in Maryland and like horses? You went to Mikey’s.Alumni include all-time leading steeplechase jockey Joe Aitcheson, top Irish jump jockey Paul Carberry, Triple Crown-winning trainer Billy Turner, champion steeplechase trainer Jack Fisher, Olympic show rider and first woman to ride the Maryland Hunt Cup Kathy Kusner, Maryland Hunt Cup-winning riders Billy Meister, Tommy Smith and Turney McKnight, Maryland Jockey Club racing secretary Georganne Hale, Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association president Richard Hoffberger, most of the hunt field at Elkridge- Harford and three women who usually start their day at Andor Farm in Monkton, Md.<br /> <br /> Formerly Foxhall Farm, home of legendary sportsman Foxhall Keene and the Foxhall Team Race, the farm serves as home for Pickett, stable for White and launching pad for Boyce.<br /> <br /> Pickett and her husband, Taylor, bought the 130-acre farm from the estate of Michael Wettach about 11 years ago. Nestled in Elkridge-Harford hunt country, just down the road from Tom and Mimi Voss’s Atlanta Hall Farm, Andor Farm, once owned by Wettach’s mother, Guggenheim heiress Barbara Obre, has a long history of horses, including Triple Crown win-ner Seattle Slew, who got his early education on the farm.<br /> <br /> When Smithwick died from a form of Parkinson’s disease in 2006, Camelot was over. Smithwick’s longtime partner, White, needed a fresh start. White had run the show at Hydes for years but needed a new base, a new project, a new life.<br /> <br /> Pickett offered it. “Laura liked what we did. They had the farm and said to me, ‘What do you think?’ ” White said. “The thing about Hyde [she doesn’t pronounce the s] was, it was never the fanciest place but it was made for horses. I never saw a horse come there who didn’t flourish.We tried to make Andor quite a bit like Hyde. It was Horse-friendly. We tried to do things the same way. It’s probably not as good as Hyde, but it’s pretty damn good.” <br /> <br /> It was very good in 2010.<br /> <br /> Focusing on quality turf horses, White, 48, produced eight wins from just 35 starts (doubling her 2009 win total) and Boyce set Laurel Park alight, earning the leading jockey title at the short summer meet and the extended fall meet, winning 110 races by the beginning of December. As for Pickett – she runs the farm, rides her hunters with White’s string, owns an occasional horse with White, and watches the show.<br /> <br /> Smithwick would be proud of the success, the theme, the approach, the alumni.<br /> <br /> Boyce credits White for her start.<br /> <br /> “Alex has been a huge help.She does things very similar to [Smithwick]. She taught me so much when I first went to Mikey’s and it’s fun to continue it,” Boyce said. “We have history, that’s why I still go there in the morning and work horses whenever she needs me. The first race I won was for Alex White. She really helped me when nobody wanted to put me on horses.” <br /> <br /> White credits Boyce for part of her success. “Forest was very instrumental this year. She breezed a lot of the horses. She’s a smart kid.She wants to learn. She never gave up. She’s a good horsewoman.The jumping people do everything – they’ve been bandaging horses at night since they were kids,” White said. “Mikey thought like a horse. It sounds crazy, but he would figure out what horses thought and what they needed.I hope some of that wore off on me. I thought he was better at that than anybody; it was like he could get in their heads.”<br /> <br /> Pickett, who worked for Smithwick for 10 years and kept her hunter at Smithwick’s farm, enjoys being a part of the success.<br /> <br /> “This place needs horses on it. I threw the offer out there and it’s worked out,” Pickett said. “We’re proud of Alex; we’re proud of the farm.Mikey’s was magical, it was absolutely magical, and I’d like to think there’s a little bit of Mikey here at Andor too.He would have loved it here.” <br /> <br /> Mythical HeroColony Club and Belarus led the way for White in 2010.<br /> <br /> Mythical Hero won twice and just missed in a tough allowance at Belmont Park in the fall. White purchased the son of Empire Maker as a 3-year-old racing prospect for $9,000 at the Keeneland Novem ber sale in 2008 from breeder Juddmonte Farms. Mythical Hero is out of Lyphard’s $988,691-earner Jolypha (a full sister to European great Dancing Brave), who finished third in the Breeders' Cup Classic- G1 behind champions A.P.Indy and Pleasant Tap, in 1992.White started Mythical Hero,With Boyce aboard, at Middleburg point-to-point in 2009.<br /> <br /> Colony Club won three times, finished fourth in the Jameela Stakes at Laurel, and was beaten four lengths in the Buffalo Trace Franklin County Stakes at Keeneland, boosting her career total to $99,464.White purchased Colony Club (Lion Hearted—Wild Shine, by Wild Again), a legacy of Allaire duPont’s prolific Bohemia Stable, at the 2007 Fasig- Tipton Midlantic Eastern Fall Yearling sale for $7,500. Colony Club, with Boyce aboard, started out at Marlborough point-to-point in 2009.<br /> <br /> Belarus won a maiden special weight on the turf at Pimlico in April (one of White’s four winners at that meet, all of whom came straight off the farm) and crushed $25,000 conditioned claimers at Laurel in November. By Polish Miner out of North of Hope, Belarus is owned, bred and trained by White and started at Marlborough in 2009 as well.<br /> <br /> “I’m so proud of those horses. They’re all classy horses and for one reason or another I got them for inexpensive prices and they’ve all flourished,” White said. “I don’t think there was a horse we paid more than $10,000 for; you have to be proud of that.<br /> <br /> “We went to Monmouth and had a second, a third, a fourth. They were 50-1. We had a filly go to Keeneland and have a terrible trip and get beat four lengths against some of the best sprinting turf fillies in the country. It Wasn’t like they were running for $10,000 each time they stepped up to the bat.” <br /> <br /> White grew up in White Post, Va., on “a big farm in a little, teeny town.” Along with her sisters, Claudia and Kathy, she rode ponies and followed her family’s footsteps. Thomas White trained a string of flat horses in New York while Priscilla White helped keep three daughters and 500 acres in check at home.<br /> <br /> White’s great uncle, Richard Croker Sr., was an American politician who was deeply involved with the New York City political machine Tammany Hall at the turn of the century.He owned Epsom Derby/ Irish Derby winner Orby and started a training cen ter in Ireland called Glencairn.<br /> <br /> Her grandfather, Thomas White, owned a farm on Long Island where the West Hills Steeplechase Meet was held.<br /> <br /> White’s father bred, owned and trained 1963 Dela ware Handicap winner Waltz Song.He would fly home on the weekends and spent winters on the Virginia farm.<br /> <br /> “I grew up with it – my father trained, his father trained.It’s bred into me,” said White.“My father was old school; he wasn’t as good a teacher as Mikey, but he was a very good horseman. My mother wasn’t a horseperson but she was the best person in the world to put up with all of us, believe me. We were brought up that way; we didn’t know anything different.”<br /> <br /> MARYLAND FUND REPORT <br /> <br /> Bonuses paid for races at Maryland tracks from November 1 to November 14, 2010<br /> <br /> All Brandy Stakes <br /> <br /> November 6. Purse $50,000-guaranteed.<br /> For 3-year-olds and up, fillies and mares, registered Maryland-breds.1 mi. (off turf). 7 com peted. (Closed with 15nominations.)Winner: BLIND DATE, by Not For Love. Breeder bonus: William M. Backer ($4,650). Stallion bonus: Not For Love Syndicate ($2,325). Second: ASK THE MOON, by Malibu Moon.Breeder bonus: Thornmar Farm LLC and Country Life Farm ($1,550). Stallion bonus: None. Third: LOVE’S BLUSH, by Not For Love. Breeder bonus: Syca more Hall Farm LLC ($852.50). Stallion bonus: Not For Love Syndicate ($426.25). Fourth: FAS CINATIN’ RHYTHM, by More Than Ready. Breeder bonus: Buckingham Farm ($465). Stallion bonus: None.<br /> <br /> Twixt Stakes <br /> <br /> November 13. Purse $50,000-guaranteed.<br /> For 3-year-old fillies, registered Maryland-breds. 1mi. 6 competed. (Closed with 15 nomi nations.) Winner: CATCH A THIEF, by Flatter. Breeder bonus: Elk Manor Farm ($4,650).Stallion bonus: None. Second: BALTI MORE BELLE, by Bowman’s Band. Breeder bonus: Carol Kaye-Garcia and Barbara Smith ($1,550). Stallion bonus: Maryland Stallion Station and Martin Schwartz ($775). Third: BRAVE AS A LION, by Lion Hearted.Breeder bonus: Bucking ham Farm ($852.50). Stallion bonus: Lion Hearted Syndicate ($426.25). Fourth: SQUABBLE, by Domestic Dispute. Breeder bonus: Skeedattle II ($465). Stallion bonus:<br /> <br /> Maryland Fund Stakes Recaps<br /> <br /> Blind Date <br /> <br /> All Brandy Stakes <br /> <br /> $50,000-guaranteed, 1 mi. (off turf), registered Maryland-bred fillies and mares, 3 & up. Laurel Park, Nov. 6.<br /> <br /> B. m., 2006, by Not For Love.Snit, by Fit to Fight. Bred and owned by William M.Backer; trained by Hamilton A. Smith. Foaled at Chanceland Farm, West Friendship, Md.<br /> <br /> Lifetime starts 1st 2nd 3rd earnings 17 8 (6) 2 (2) 1 (1) $357,260 (through Nov. 6) <br /> <br /> 2008: 3rd Maryland Million Lassie S. 2009: 1st $50,000 Hookedonthefeelin S, 5 fur., turf, registered Md.-bred 3-year-old fillies, Pimlico, April 18; $50,000 Hilltop S, 11.16 mi., turf, 3-yearold fillies, Pimlico, May 15; $150,000 Virginia Oaks-G3, 11.8 mi., turf, 3-yearold fillies, Colonial, July 18; $50,000 Pearl Necklace S, 1 mi. (off turf), registered Md.-bred 3-year-old fillies, Laurel, Aug. 22; 2nd Maryland Million Oaks. 2010: 1st $100,000 Maryland Million Distaff H, 7 fur., fillies andmares, 3 and up, sired by eligible MdStallions, Laurel, Oct. 2; $50,000 All Brandy S, 1 mi. (off turf), registered Md.-bred fillies and mares,3 & up, Laurel, Nov. 6; 2nd Geisha S.<br /> <br /> With a late surge closing in on the finish line, William M. Backer’s homebred Blind Date pushed to the fore and won the All Brandy Stakes on November 6. The 3-5 favorite beat six other Maryland-bred fillies and mares in the onemile test that had been moved from the soggy turf to the fast main track after heavy rains earlier in the week.<br /> <br /> Erick Rodriguez kept Blind Date far back from pacesetter Fascinatin’ Rhythm, who led to the three-sixteenths marker before surrendering fairly easily when confronted by Ask the Moon, who had joined Blind Date in the run to the finish line. Blind Date completed the distance in 1:38.06 and finished three-quarters of a length ahead of Ask the Moon, while defending champion Love’s Blush loomed a threat but finished third. Next in order of finish were Fascinatin’ Rhythm, Amelia’s Brio, My Sweet Nenana and Profit.<br /> <br /> Blind Date (by Not For Love), trained by Hamilton Smith, has been a consistent performer on both the turf and the main track, and was voted champion Marylandbred 3-year-old filly of 2009.She came into the All Brandy off a strong victory in the Maryland Million Distaff Handicap. This was her sixth career stakes victory.<br /> <br /> “We’re very proud of her,” said Smith of his star. “It looked as if she wasn’t getting In gear as she usually does but once she got clear, she made a run.” <br /> <br /> “I really had plenty of horse,” said Rodriguez. “I didn’t know how much horse Karamanos [Horacio Karamanos on Ask the Moon] had but I was comfortable. I was in between horses and waiting to see what happened. I just had a lot more horse.” <br /> <br /> Blind Date, who is now 8-of-17 lifetime with earnings of $357,260, is out of Backer’s good race mare Snit (by Fit to Fight; $454,547, Cotillion H-G2, etc.), who is also the dam of stakes winner Sales Tax ($178,266, All Brandy S, etc.) and stakes-placed Bitter Lemon.<br /> <br /> Catch a Thief <br /> <br /> Twixt Stakes $50,000-guaranteed, 1 mi., registered Maryland-bred 3-year-old fillies.<br /> Laurel Park, Nov. 13.<br /> <br /> Dk.b./br.f., 2007, by Flatter—Nabbed, by Red Ransom. Bred by Elk Manor Farm; owned by Charles Dimino; trained by Timothy A. Hills. Foaled at Elk Manor Farm, North East, Md.<br /> <br /> Lifetime starts 1st 2nd 3rd earnings 7 4 (1) 2 (1) 0 $158,900 (through Nov. 13) <br /> <br /> 2010: 1st $50,000 Twixt S, 1 mi., registered Md.-bred 3-year-old fillies, Laurel, Nov. 13; 2nd Catinca S. <br /> <br /> Charles Dimino’s Catch a Thief lost the lead but reasserted herself in deep stretch and won the Twixt Stakes for Maryland-bred 3-year-old fillies on November 13.<br /> <br /> The overwhelming 3-10 favorite beat five others, including runner-up Baltimore Belle, in the one-turn test. Harry Vega kept the daughter of Flatter on or close to the lead before re-rallying to win by three and a quarter lengths. Brave as a Lion, Squabble, Malibu Moon Dance and Miss Speak followed.<br /> <br /> “I thought we were in trouble turning for home because it is a deeper track than she’s been racing on,” said trainer Tim Hills. “I wasn’t too worried about the distance. Flatter is an A.P. Indy and a mile is well within her scope.” <br /> <br /> Catch a Thief has finished first or second in six of her seven career starts, including four victories, for earnings of $158,900. The runner-up, who won the Maryland Million Oaks in her last start, on October 2, finished first or second in eight of nine races during her sophomore season.<br /> <br /> “Beating a horse like Baltimore Belle you got to have on your running shoes,” said Vega. “My filly, as soon as she got headed, got mad and started to run. It’s a good feeling when you get a horse hooked and you’re the one that takes off. Both fillies ran well.” <br /> <br /> Catch a Thief completed the one mile on the main track in 1:38.39. <br /> <br /> She is the latest of numerous stakes winners bred by Elk Manor Farm, the North East, Md., establishment operated for many years by Jim Moran, who died in April 2008, and continued by his son, Matthew Moran. The first stakes performer for her dam, Nabbed (by Red Ransom), Catch a Thief was sold for $25,000 at the 2009 Fasig- Tipton Midlantic 2-year-olds in training sale.<br /> <br /> Maryland-bred Stakes Winners<br /> <br /> Maryland-bred 2-year-old wins graded stakes in California <br /> <br /> Neversaidiwassweet, a Eurosilver filly bred in Maryland by the Alan S. Kline Revocable Trust, scored an impressive victory in the $100,000 Miesque Stakes-G3 at Hollywood Park on November 28.<br /> <br /> Carrying the colors of John Brunetti’s Red Oak Stable, Nev ersaidiwassweet, the second choice in the field of seven, rallied for a half-length win under jockey Rafael Bejarano.The Jerry Hollendorfer trainee completed the mile over firm turf in 1:35.88. <br /> <br /> “She didn’t show me any speed today because she broke really, really slow,” Bejarano said. “I had to change my game plan because I thought I was going to be on the lead easy. After the first turn, all I could do was stay behind and make one big run. One time she ran really well at Ellis Park [her July 17 debut]. She came from behind and finished second and I knew she could do the same thing today if she had to.” <br /> <br /> Said Hollendorfer: “She’s worked well on the synthetic, and I think she’ll run on dirt, too, but we have to prove that, I guess. In my observation of her gallop out, I would think she could get a lot more distance.” <br /> <br /> A Keeneland September yearling RNA at $7,000, Never saidiwassweet sold for $28,000 as an Ocala Breeders’ Sales Company April 2-yearold.<br /> She is the third foal, and only runner, out of the unraced Storm Creek mare Surging Storm (also bred in Maryland by Kline), who has since produced a yearling filly by Officer. Tracing back to one of Kline’s foundation mares, Electric Blanket, Never saidi was sweet’s third dam, this is the family of multiple Grade 2 winner Looie Capote (Capote), dual Italian Group 3 victor Heart of Groom (Blushing Groom-Ire) and Canadian Grade 3 heroine Feathers (Cherokee Run).<br /> <br /> Neversaidiwassweet began her career with trainer Greg Compton, finishing second and sixth in her first two starts over turf at Ellis Park.Sent to trainer Kristin Mulhall in California, the juvenile responded to the change in climate and barns to win a maiden special weight at a mile over turf on October 14 at Oak Tree at Hollywood Park, and was purchased by Brunetti following that score.Recording her second straight victory at Hollywood, the filly improved her record to 4-2-1-0 and $86,370 in earnings.<br /> <br /> Steady Warrior lives up to his name in Tri-State Futurity <br /> <br /> Steady Warrior, the 2-yearold colt who rose to the fore with an impressive victory on Maryland Million Day, affirmed his quality with a dom Inating performance in the $100,000 Tri-State Futurity on November 6 at Charles Town.<br /> <br /> The Maryland-bred stumbled coming out of the gate and went to his knees, then righted himself for a length and a quarter victory over stablemate Bumpy Road in the seven-furlong race for 2-yearolds foaled in Maryland, Virginia or West Virginia.<br /> <br /> Co-owned by his breeder, Foard Wilgis and David Picarello’s ZWP Stable, and trainer Gary Capuano, Steady Warrior has registered three wins and one second in four lifetime starts, earning $194,358. He was runner-up in Delaware Park’s First State Dash Stakes on October 16.<br /> <br /> Steady Warrior (out of the Malibu Moon mare Slow and Steady) is from the first crop of Cherokee’s Boy, who won the 2002 Tri-State Futurity en route to honors as Maryland-bred 2-year-old champion. Cherokee’s Boy (by Citi dancer) is one of three horses to win the Tri-State Futurity and also sire a winner of that race. Now standing at Allen and Audrey Murray’s Murmur Farm in Darlington, Md., Cherokee’s Boy earned $1,177,946 and was Marylandbred Horse of the Year in 2005.<br /> <br /> Patriot’s Path gets his PA Hunt Cup <br /> <br /> Second in 2008, a faller at the last fence in 2009, Patriot’s Path finally got his Pennsylvania Hunt Cup, at age 10, on November 7 at Unionville, Pa.Owned by Irv Naylor and trained by Desmond Fogarty, the Maryland-bred son of Carnivalay had to win a threeway stretch battle with Bon Caddo and Professor Maxwell to get there but won for the third time this fall.<br /> <br /> Bon Caddo set a measured pace throughout, skipped away after the second-last and had company from the winner and Professor Maxwell at the last. Bon Caddo landed running and built a narrow advantage in the first three strides but couldn’t withstand Patriot’s Path’s late energy.Professor Maxwell settled for third.<br /> <br /> Timber champion in 2009, Patriot’s Path capped that season with a heavy fall in the Pennsylvania Hunt Cup.He opened 2010 with four straight losses, but rebounded with victories at Genesee, Far Hills and Unionville./STpublishing.com <br /> <br /> Farah T Salute scores for (Jazz) Napravnik Owner/trainer/breeder Jazz Napravnik picked up a stakes win on November 6 when Farah T Salute captured the $30,000 Crown Royal Hurdle Stakes at the Callaway Gardens Steeplechase in Pine Mountain, Ga.<br /> <br /> The mare prevailed in a stretch battle over The Manner Born to win by a halflength for jockey Xavier Aizpuru while covering two and a quarter miles in 4:01.60. Lonesome Nun finished third in the race, the final stakes for fillies/mares on the 2010 National Steeplechase Association schedule.<br /> <br /> Farah T Salute won for the first time in six 2010 starts at age 7, but came off a third (to stablemate Green Velvet) in the $50,000 Peapack at Far Hills on October 23 and was second (beaten just a half length) at Fair Hill in May. Napravnik, sister of flat jockey Anna Napravnik, bred her mare Farah’s Moment to three-day event horse Boy Done Good – hoping for a steeplechaser or (as a backup plan) an event horse. She got Farah T Salute, who owns two wins on the flat and three over jumps. She has $90,700 in career earnings with the latest victory.<br /> <br /> The winner traces to strong Maryland bloodlines – her sire is by Salutely and her dam is by Christopher R.<br /> <br /> Maryland Horse Industry Board awards grants totaling $17,693 <br /> <br /> From the Maryland Department of Agriculture<br /> <br /> Therapeutic programs, equine rescue organizations, youth clubs, educational and research programs are among the 18 organizations receiving $17,693 in grants from the Maryland Horse Industry Board. The grants help to strengthen the industry by building awareness of and involvement in the horse industry through research, education and promotional activities.<br /> <br /> “The equine industry is an integral part of Maryland’s cultural and economic heritage,” said Maryland Agriculture Secretary Buddy Hance.“The scope and value of projects that the board evaluated illustrates the demand for these grants, and the ‘feed fund’ continues to make it possible to support more of those requests.” <br /> <br /> Funding for these grants was unavailable until Governor Martin O’Malley and the legislature approved the current budget appropriation.The funds were made possible through legislation entered in the 2009 session by Delegate Virginia Clagett.The Maryland Feed Fund, established during the 2002 legislative session, provides an ongoing source of money to promote the horse industry.The refundable $6 per ton assessment on equine feed costs about $3 per horse per year to the horse owner and supports this grant program as well as other promotional, research and outreach activities undertaken by the Maryland Horse Industry Board.<br /> <br /> The board received 46 grant applications totaling more than $188,000, demonstrating the need for this funding. Projects were evaluated for value to the industry, degree of industry promotion, size and scope of the activity, financial need, and quality of the written presentation. Since 2001, the board has awarded 174 grants totaling more than $197,000. Visit www.mda. state.md.us/pdf/mhib10.pdf for a summary of the most recent grants awarded.<br /> <br /> The Maryland Horse Industry Board was established in 1998 to promote and develop the horse industry. For more information, visit www.Marylandhorseindustry.org or call (410) 841-5861.<br /> <br /> U of Md. Produces show on retired race horses<br /> <br /> “A Second Career for Race horses” offers an educated view of one of the most important issues facing the industry.<br /> <br /> The five and a half-minute video features University of Maryland horse extension specialist Erin Pittman and her husband, sport horse trainer/rider Steuart Pittman, both of whom have led initiatives to retrain former runners.<br /> <br /> It is narrated by sports broadcaster and University of Maryland graduate Bonnie Bernstein.<br /> <br /> The segment is available through the University of Mary land’s TerpVision, a production of University Marketing and Communications, in collaboration with the Philip Merrill College of Journalism and UMTV.<br /> <br /> “A Second Career for Racehorses” may be viewed at www.terpvision.umd.edu.<br /> <br /> In memoriam<br /> <br /> Catharine J. Allan <br /> <br /> Catharine J. Allan, an accomplished Maryland horsewoman, died on November 7 at the age of 92.<br /> <br /> A long-time resident of Stevenson, the former Catharine Jackson was for many years an active member of the Green Spring Valley Hounds.<br /> <br /> In 1952, Captain Black carried her colors to a second-place finish in the Maryland Hunt Cup.<br /> <br /> With her first husband, Gary Black Sr., Mrs. Allan had two children: Gary Black Jr. And Catharine B. (Wildie) Peterson, herself a prominent member of Maryland’s horse community along with her husband, Dr. Frederick Peterson.<br /> <br /> Mrs.Allan was predeceased by her husbands Dr. Nicholas L. Ballich and Dr. J. Hamilton Allan.<br /> <br /> Bryan Koch <br /> <br /> Bryan Koch, a farrier who built a widespread reputation for his success with difficult cases, died on October 6. He was 55. <br /> <br /> A native of Greene, N.Y., where he got his first exposure to his future trade with the draft horses on his grandfather’s large working farm, Mr. Koch grew up in Reisterstown.<br /> <br /> After graduating from Franklin High School, he went on to the Oklahoma Farriers College and immediately launched his career as a farrier.<br /> <br /> He and his wife, former horse trainer Marcy Koch, moved to Westminster in 1979, and in 1988 established Anvil Mountain Farm in that area.<br /> <br /> Mr. Koch’s practice encompassed race horses, sport and pleasure horses.<br /> <br /> “He did the same shoeing job whether it was a pony or a $300,000 stallion,” said Mrs. Koch. “It was the horse he was concerned about.”<br /> <br /> Your opportunity to support MHBA<br /> <br /> Do you buy Southern States feed?<br /> <br /> Send your “proofs of purchase” seals (including bulk bin delivery tickets) for Triple Crown, Reliance and Legends horse feeds to the MHBA.<br /> <br /> The Maryland Horse Industry Foundation will earn credit and receive a contribution from Southern States’ S.H.O.W. Program for non-profits.<br />

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